How to avoid mushy/sticky plov and get fluffy, separate rice grains (рассыпчатый плов)

Properly cooked plov: rice grains separate from each other, not mushy

For the longest time, my plov would always turn out too sticky and mushy, and I didn’t know why. I assumed it was because I didn’t have the special rice used in Uzbekistan. Occasionally, my plov would magically turn out perfect, but I wasn’t able to replicate it. Recipes online had all sorts of conflicting information, from soaking the rice, to not soaking the rice, to adding 2cm of water on top of the rice, to adding no water at all. I experimented with all sorts of things and in the end usually just ended up with a pot of sticky rice.

But now, after two years of making plov, I have finally figured out what causes it, and how to make perfect plov every time.

Overly sticky plov is caused by cooking the rice with too much water. To make perfect plov, figure out the exact water to rice ratio required by the rice you use.

It’s as simple as that. All of that water you add to the pot needs to be absorbed by the rice or evaporated. Most of it will be absorbed. If you add too much water, the rice absorbs too much, and it becomes sticky and mushy.

Ironically, most plov recipes seem to be rather vague about how much water is needed, usually suggesting you add 1-2cm of water on top of the rice. Adding that much water is most likely going to lead to mushy rice. In fact, when you watch videos of professional plov makers, it usually looks like they are pushing around a big layer of dry rice on top (it is cooked by steam).

Further complicating things is the issue of whether the rice should be soaked or not. Some claim that this can remove more starch and make the rice less sticky. After going through a long period of soaking the rice, I have decided it is best not to soak the rice. Your rice is going to absorb some amount of water depending on how long it soaks, how absorbent the rice is, and ambient conditions. If it absorbs more, you need to add less water later, and vice versa. Since it’s difficult to know how much the rice absorbs, this adds a layer of uncertainty. It is very easy to add too much water, ending up in a ruined, overly sticky plov. If you do not soak, you can control exactly how much water goes into your rice. You can achieve a perfect plov texture without any soaking. It’s best just to avoid this potentially plov-ruining step.

Step by step, here is how to ensure the right water amount.
1. Determine the correct water to rice ratio. The ratio is of weight, not of volume. To figure this out, you can weigh a small amount of uncooked rice, then cook it to the ideal texture and weigh the cooked rice. The difference of weight, divided by the weight of the uncooked rice, will tell you the water to rice ratio. Here is a page from Stalic Khankishiev where he tries this on several different rice variants. I calculated the ratios for some common ones below:
Paella rice (calasparra and bomba): 1.4:1
Basmati rice: 1.65:1
Risotto rice (arborio): 1.1:1
Importantly, these are only guidelines, and the ratio may vary even for different brands of the same type of rice. You may find you need more or less water for your specific rice.

Calasparra rice I use for plov.

2. Do not soak your rice. As stated above, this introduces uncertainty because we don’t know how much gets soaked up. You could, in theory, weigh the soaked rice, figure out a ratio, then soak your rice in the exact same way each time, but I just don’t see the point. Plov tastes perfectly good without soaking.

3. Measure exactly the right amount of water, and add all of the water in the broth stage. Eyeballing the ratio is not going to work reliably. I eyeball basically everything in cooking, but this is the one thing I do not.

4. Do not add any extra water during the rice cooking stage. Only add water if your rice is too hard (literally can’t chew through it) and there is no water left in the pot. By not soaking and not adding any additional water later, we have controlled the maximum amount of water our rice can absorb.

This is what it looks like when I put the rice in for cooking. No additional water is added.

The water to rice ratio is the number one determinant in whether the plov will be sticky/mushy or not. But here are a few other things to consider:

Pick a rice type and stick with it – Some variants of rice are more prone to stickiness than others. East Asian rice is simply unworkable no matter how careful you are with water ratios, as it is naturally sticky and starchy. Risotto rice tends to be sticky. Basmati rice tends to be un-sticky, but isn’t really the correct shape or texture. I have been happiest with paella rice. The important thing is to pick one type of rice, learn exactly how to cook it, and stick with it. When you switch rice types, you are apt to screw up the plov.

Wash the rice – Don’t soak the rice, but just before adding it in, you need to wash it – run the faucet over it, mix it around with your fingers, and pour out the cloudy water. Repeat until the water is nearly clear (you won’t get it perfectly clear). Then add directly into the broth. This gets the starch off the rice, helping it to be less sticky.

Advertisements

One thought on “How to avoid mushy/sticky plov and get fluffy, separate rice grains (рассыпчатый плов)

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s